Proportion of babies breastfed at six to eight weeks lowest in England for four years

Data published by Public Health England reveals the proportion of babies who are still being breastfed six to eight weeks after birth in England has fallen to its lowest level in the past four years | via OnMedica

The data covers the period 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018, and were submitted by local authorities on a voluntary basis through an interim reporting system set up to collect health visiting activity data at a local authority resident level. baby-21167_1920

Some 140 out of 150 local authorities provided sufficient data, and their returns show an aggregate prevalence of 42.7% for 2017-18. This compares with 44.1% in 2016-17; 43.1% in 2015-16; and 43.8% in 2014-15.

Dr Max Davie, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health officer for health promotion said: “Breast milk gives babies the best possible start in life. These figures are therefore disappointing, but sadly not surprising.”

He said the significant drop-off at the six to eight-week mark was due to a range of factors, which included lack of local support services, social stigma around breastfeeding in public as well as “inconsistent messaging from health professionals.”

Full story at OnMedica

Full detail:

Breastfeeding at 6 to 8 weeks after birth: annual data | Public Health England:

 

Maternity Services dashboard

NHS Digital | August 2018 | Maternity Services dashboard

The dashboard enables maternity clinical teams to view data collected from providers in England and regularly compare their own clinical outcomes to identify areas for quality improvement.

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The dashboard is aimed at maternity clinical teams and decision makers within Local Maternity Systems (LMS). However, the public and Maternity Voices Partnerships may wish to compare maternity services using this tool.

Further details available at NHS Digital 

Child and maternal health statistics

Updated statistics to support improvements in decision making when planning services for pregnant women, children, young people and families | Public Health England

Contents include:

  1. Overview of child health and child health profiles
  2. Pregnancy and birth statistics
  3. Breastfeeding statistics
  4. Early years statistics
  5. School-age children statistics
  6. Young people statistics
  7. Health visitor service delivery metrics
  8. Child development outcomes at 2 to 2 and a half years metrics

Full detail at Public Health England

 

Child development outcomes at 2 to 2 and a half years metrics: 2017 to 2018

The latest statistics for child development outcomes have been published by Public Health England  (PHE) which collects data submitted by local authorities.

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The data is collected from the health visitor reviews completed at 2 to 2 and a half years using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire 3 (ASQ-3).

The metrics presented are ‘the percentage of children who were at or above the expected level’ in these areas of development:

  • communication skills
  • gross motor skills
  • fine motor skills
  • problem solving skills
  • personal-social skills
  • all five areas of development

The  data table and statistical commentary  are available

Guidance on using these statistics and other resources can also be found here

 

Child protection in the UK

The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) has published How safe are our children? 2017: the most comprehensive overview of child protection in the UK.

This fifth annual report compiles and analyses the most up-to-date child protection data that exists across the UK for 2017. It sets out twenty different indicators, each of which looks at the question of ‘how safe are our children?’ from a different perspective. The report also includes historic data, to help track progress over time.

Retrospective cohort study of all deaths among infants born between 22 and 27 completed weeks of gestation

The aim of this research is to assess causes and circumstances of deaths in extremely low gestational age neonates (ELGANs) born in Switzerland over a 3-year period | BMJ Open

Design: Population-based, retrospective cohort study.

Setting: All nine level III perinatal centres (neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and affiliated obstetrical services) in Switzerland.

Patients: ELGANs with a gestational age (GA) <28 weeks who died between 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2015.

Results: A total of 594 deaths were recorded with 280 (47%) stillbirths and 314 (53%) deaths after live birth. Of the latter, 185 (59%) occurred in the delivery room and 129 (41%) following admission to an NICU. Most liveborn infants dying in the delivery room had a GA ≤24 weeks and died following primary non-intervention. In contrast, NICU deaths occurred following unrestricted life support regardless of GA. End-of-life decision-making and redirection of care were based on medical futility and anticipated poor quality of life in 69% and 28% of patients, respectively. Most infants were extubated before death (87%).

Conclusions: In Switzerland, most deaths among infants born at less than 24 weeks of gestation occurred in the delivery room. In contrast, most deaths of ELGANs with a GA ≥24 weeks were observed following unrestricted provisional intensive care, end-of-life decision-making and redirection of care in the NICU regardless of the degree of immaturity.

Full reference: Berger, T.M. et al. (2017) Retrospective cohort study of all deaths among infants born between 22 and 27 completed weeks of gestation in Switzerland over a 3-year period. BMJ Open. 7:e015179

Women’s Smoking Status at Time of Delivery

This report presents the latest results and trends from the women’s smoking status at time of delivery (SATOD) data collection in England. 

The results provide a measure of the prevalence of smoking among pregnant women at Commissioning Region, Region and Clinical Commissioning Group level.

Key facts

In 2016/17:

  • 10.5 per cent of pregnant women were known to be smokers at the time of delivery. This compares to 10.6 per cent for the previous year (2015/16), and is down from 15.1 per cent in 2006/07.
  • This is the second consecutive year that the proportion has been below the national ambition of 11 per cent.
  • The CCGs with the lowest proportion of women known to be smokers at the time of delivery were NHS West London (2.3 per cent), NHS Richmond (2.5) and NHS Hammersmith and Fulham (2.7).
  • The CCGs with the highest proportion were NHS Blackpool (28.1 per cent), NHS Hull (22.9) and NHS North East Lincolnshire (22.3).
  • 104 out of 209 CCGs met the national ambition of 11 per cent or less.

The report can be viewed here