Access and quality of maternity care for disabled women

More disabled women are becoming mothers, and yet, their care is rarely the focus of quantitative research. This study aimed to investigate access and quality of maternity care for women with differing disabilities | BMJ Open

Results: Overall, 20‰094 women completed and returned the survey; 1958 women (9.5%) self-identified as having a disability. The findings indicate some gaps in maternity care provision for these women relating to interpersonal aspects of care: communication, feeling listened to and supported, involvement in decision making, having a trusted and respected relationship with clinical staff. Women from all disability groups wanted more postnatal contacts and help with infant feeding.

Conclusion: While access to care was generally satisfactory for disabled women, women’s emotional well-being and support during pregnancy and beyond is an area that is in need of improvement. Specific areas identified included disseminating information effectively, ensuring appropriate communication and understanding, and supporting womens sense of control to build trusting relationships with healthcare providers.

Full reference: Malouf, R. et al. (2017) Access and quality of maternity care for disabled women during pregnancy, birth and the postnatal period in England: data from a national survey. BMJ Open. 7:e016757

 

Access and quality of maternity care for disabled women

More disabled women are becoming mothers, and yet, their care is rarely the focus of quantitative research. This study aimed to investigate access and quality of maternity care for women with differing disabilities | BMJ Open

Results: Overall, 20‰094 women completed and returned the survey; 1958 women (9.5%) self-identified as having a disability. The findings indicate some gaps in maternity care provision for these women relating to interpersonal aspects of care: communication, feeling listened to and supported, involvement in decision making, having a trusted and respected relationship with clinical staff. Women from all disability groups wanted more postnatal contacts and help with infant feeding.

Conclusion: While access to care was generally satisfactory for disabled women, women’s emotional well-being and support during pregnancy and beyond is an area that is in need of improvement. Specific areas identified included disseminating information effectively, ensuring appropriate communication and understanding, and supporting womens sense of control to build trusting relationships with healthcare providers.

Full reference: Malouf, R. et al. (2017) Access and quality of maternity care for disabled women during pregnancy, birth and the postnatal period in England: data from a national survey. BMJ Open. 7:e016757

 

Maternity transformation programme

NHS England has announced details of the seven local areas who will be taking forward the recommendations set out in its report Better Births.

The Early Adopter sites will test a range of new and innovative ways of working to help transform maternity services such as: using small teams of midwives to offer greater continuity of care to women; creating single points of access to a wider range of maternity services; making better use of electronic records to provide more joined up care; improving postnatal care and providing better personalised care planning.

Read more via NHS England

Identifying and managing clinical risks in newborn babies and providing care for infants in the community who need respiratory support

This review looked at how risks for newborn babies are identified and managed and at the care for infants in the community who need respiratory support. | CQC

Newborn babies may need extra care in a neonatal intensive care unit or special care baby unit if they were born prematurely or if they need care for a particular health condition. Babies and infants that need long-term care can be transferred to a local unit or discharged to receive care at home. A baby with complex health needs may move between distinct areas of care or ‘pathways’.

This review focused on the quality and variability of NHS care, to help identify if there are gaps that need to be addressed. By doing this,the report aims to identify opportunities for improvement and influence the development of clear national guidelines.

Full reference: Identifying and managing clinical risks in newborn babies and providing care for infants in the community who need respiratory support

 

Determinants of Quality of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults With Chronic Illnesses: A Mixed Methods Study

Al-Yateem, N. et al. Journal of Pediatric Nursing. Available online: 15 January 2016

Highlights

•   The findings of this study provide healthcare professionals with a relevant set of care elements and quality determinants that can inform their service while caring for adolescents and young adults especially those with chronic illness.

•   The identified quality determinants are applicable to all clinical settings caring for adolescents and young adults transitioning from childhood to adulthood as the developmental tasks of this stage tend to be similar across cultures.

•   Four determinants of quality essential to health care provided for adolescents and young adults were identified:

•   The provision of adolescent friendly information relating to all aspects of living with CF

•   Services that facilitate and encourage independence

•   Services characterized by structure with the capacity to be both dynamic and responsive

•   Health care professionals knowledgeable and skilled in adolescent specific issues

View the article abstract here