Mindfulness and attachment styles through mother and infant interaction

Recently, research has focused on mindfulness as a potential variable to interrupt the transmission of insecure attachment and disrupt its effect across generations. | Infant Mental Health Journal

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Thirty-six regnant female participants completed the Five Facets Mindfulness Questionnaire and Relationship Questionnaire-Clinical Version at 30 weeks’ gestation. Following the infant’s birth, mothers and their babies participated in a video-recorded feeding session at 7 to 10 weeks’ postpartum. It was predicted that a secure attachment style and higher levels of mindfulness measured prenatally would be associated with greater maternal responsiveness postpartum. The hypothesis was supported for both the secure and insecure (fearful and profoundly distrustful) attachment styles. Mindfulness did not mediate the relationship between attachment and maternal distress. The mindfulness subscale Non-Reacting was significantly associated with maternal response to distress. These findings support the role of prenatal mindfulness skills and attachment security for later postnatal maternal sensitivity to baby.

Full reference: Pickard, J.A. et al. (2017) Observing the influence of mindfulness and attachment styles through mother and infant interaction: A longitudinal study Infant Mental Health Journal. DOI: 10.1002/imhj.21645

Ultrasound for children with broken arms: Accurate, faster, less painful than X-rays

Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) assessment of distal forearm injuries in children is accurate, timely, and associated with low levels of pain and high caregiver satisfaction | ScienceDaily

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There are many goals when managing children with suspected fractures of the arm. These include being fast and accurate in the diagnosis, not causing more pain and limiting exposure to radiation. Achieving these goals can result in high rates of caregiver satisfaction. Dr. Poonai’s study suggests that POCUS may be a viable alternative to x-ray with respect to diagnostic accuracy, cost effectiveness, pain, caregiver satisfaction, and procedure duration.

Read the full overview via ScienceDaily here

The original research article is available here

Mindful Parenting Group Training for Mothers and Their Babies

Potharst, E.S. et al. Mindfulness | Published online: 13 April 2017

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Many mothers experience difficulties after the birth of a baby. Mindful parenting may have benefits for mothers and babies, because it can help mothers regulate stress, and be more attentive towards themselves and their babies, which may have positive effects on their responsivity. This study examined the effectiveness of Mindful with your baby, an 8-week mindful parenting group training for mothers with their babies.

Read the full article here

Decision making for children with life-limiting conditions and life-threatening illnesses

Bluebond-Langner, M. et al. (2017) Archives of Disease in Childhood. 102(5) pp. 468-471

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The relationship between parents and clinician is critical to the care and treatment of children with life-limiting conditions (LLCs) and life-threatening illnesses (LTIs). This relationship is built and maintained largely in consultations. In this article we lay out factors that bear on the success of clinical consultations and the maintenance of the essential clinician–parent relationship at progression or deterioration of LLCs or LTIs.

We suggest an approach to engaging parents in conversations about care and treatment that recognises and appreciates the dilemmas which clinicians and parents face and in so doing provides a way for everyone to live with the decisions that are made. A close analysis of a consultation at progression and excerpts of encounters among parents, clinician and researcher are used to illustrate our approach to research, analysis and development of recommendations for clinical practice.

Read the full article here

Parents struggle with choosing allergy medicine for their children

Dosing, labeling and a seemingly endless range of allergy medication options can make picking the right medicine a complicated task for some parents | ScienceDaily

As allergy season kicks into high gear, many parents are likely searching for over-the-counter medications to help relieve children of symptoms like sneezing, coughing and congestion.

But dosing, labeling and a seemingly endless range of allergy medication options can make picking the right medicine a complicated task for some parents, suggests today’s report from the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan.

Read the full overview here

Parents’ reactions can lessen or worsen pain for injured kids

New research (yet to be published) has looked at family coping and distress during a dressing change following a burn injury in kids | The Conversation

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The 18-month study observed 92 families during their young child’s (one to six years) first burn dressing change at a Brisbane hospital.

Parents who reported they were more anxious or distressed were less able to support their child during the procedure. This decreased the child’s ability to cope and increased the child’s distress, which was measured by their ability to be distracted by toys and conversation, compared to crying or screaming during the dressing change.

Ratings of child anxiety and pain during the dressing change were also greater for children of parents who were less able to support their child during the dressing change.

Read the full blog post by  Erin Brown & Justin Kenardy here

Parents’ and informal caregivers’ views and experiences of communication about routine childhood vaccination: a synthesis of qualitative evidence

Ames HMR, Glenton C, Lewin S. Parents’ and informal caregivers’ views and experiences of communication about routine childhood vaccination: a synthesis of qualitative evidence. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2017, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD011787. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011787.pub2.

This review of 38 studies, mainly from high-income countries, finds that parents want more information about childhood vaccinations, including for example balanced information on benefits and risks, given before the vaccination appointment and not during.