Cochrane reviews show impact of lifestyle changes on obesity

Two Cochrane reviews, published today, show that a combination of diet, physical activity and behavioural change interventions may reduce weight in children and adolescents | OnMedica

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The two reviews look at the effects of diet, physical activity and behavioural interventions in treating children with overweight or obesity from six years old to early adulthood. They summarise the results of 114 studies which involved over 13,000 children and young people.

Eggs can significantly increase growth in young children

Eggs significantly increased growth and reduced stunting by 47 percent in young children, finds a new study from a leading expert on child nutrition | ScienceDaily

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Eggs significantly increased growth and reduced stunting by 47 percent in young children, finds a new study from a leading expert on child nutrition at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. This was a much greater effect than had been shown in previous studies.

Eggs were shown to increase standardized length-for-age score and weight-for-age score. Models indicated a reduced prevalence of stunting by 47 percent and underweight by 74 percent. Children in the treatment group had higher dietary intakes of eggs and reduced intake of sugar-sweetened foods compared to control.

Managing the fussy eater

At some point in time most parents will describe their child as a ‘fussy eater’ | Paediatrics and Child Health

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Because fussiness is not well defined and can, of course, be very subjective, it is sometimes difficult to estimate the prevalence of real ‘fussy’ eating. It is best described as food refusal above and beyond the expected norm, but because different questionnaires measuring different constructs are given to parents of children of a range of ages, the best we can do is to come up with an estimate of around 30% of children being described as truly ‘fussy’.

Full reference: Harris, G. (2017) Managing the fussy eater. Paediatrics and Child Health. Published online: May 19, 2017

A realist review to explore how low-income pregnant women use food vouchers

Ohly H, et al. (2017) BMJ Open. 7:e013731

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Objectives: To explore how low-income pregnant women use Healthy Start food vouchers, the potential impacts of the programme, and which women might experience these impacts and why.

Conclusions: This realist review suggests that some low-income pregnant women may use Healthy Start vouchers to increase their consumption of fruits and vegetables and plain cow’s milk, whereas others may use them to reduce food expenditure and save money for other things.

Read the full article here

Self-management and social welfare of children with cystic fibrosis

Calvo-Lerma, J. et al. (2017) Innovative approach for self-management and social welfare of children with cystic fibrosis in Europe: development, validation and implementation of an mHealth tool (MyCyFAPP). BMJ Open. 7:e014931

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Introduction: For the optimal management of children with cystic fibrosis, there are currently no efficient tools for the precise adjustment of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, either for advice on appropriate dietary intake or for achieving an optimal nutrition status. Therefore, we aim to develop a mobile application that ensures a successful nutritional therapy in children with cystic fibrosis.

Methods and analysis: A multidisciplinary team of 12 partners coordinate their efforts in 9 work packages that cover the entire so-called ‘from laboratory to market’ approach by means of an original and innovative co-design process. A cohort of 200 patients with cystic fibrosis aged 1–17 years are enrolled. We will develop an innovative, clinically tested mobile health application for patients and health professionals involved in cystic fibrosis management. The mobile application integrates the research knowledge and innovative tools for maximising self-management with the aim of leading to a better nutritional status, quality of life and disease prognosis. Bringing together different and complementary areas of knowledge is fundamental for tackling complex challenges in disease treatment, such as optimal nutrition and pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in cystic fibrosis. Patients are expected to benefit the most from the outcomes of this innovative project.

Read the full protocol here

The association between weight, height, and head circumference reconsidered

Scheffler, K. et al. (2017) Pediatric Research. Published online: 1 March 2017

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Background: Under normal nutritional and health conditions, body height, weight and head circumference are significantly related. We hypothesize that the apparent general association between weight, height, and head circumference of the growing child might be misleading.

 

Conclusion: Under appropriate nutritional and health circumstances, nutritional status, body size, and head circumference are not related.

Read the full abstract here

The Speed of Increasing milk Feeds: RCT Protocol

Abbott, J. et al. BMC Pediatrics. Published: 28 January 2017

Background: In the UK, 1–2% of infants are born very preterm (<32 weeks of gestation) or have very low birth weight (<1500 g). Very preterm infants are initially unable to be fed nutritional volumes of milk and therefore require intravenous nutrition. Milk feeding strategies influence several long and short term health outcomes including growth, survival, infection (associated with intravenous nutrition) and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC); with both infection and NEC being key predictive factors of long term disability.

Currently there is no consistent strategy for feeding preterm infants across the UK. The SIFT trial will test two speeds of increasing milk feeds with the primary aim of determining effects on survival without moderate or severe neurodevelopmental disability at 24 months of age, corrected for prematurity. The trial will also examine many secondary outcomes including infection, NEC, time taken to reach full feeds and growth.

Read the full protocol here