Postnatal mental illness

The National Childbirth Trust (NCT) has published The hidden half: bringing postnatal mental illness out of hiding.

pnd

Image source: http://www.nct.org.uk

The Hidden Half campaign surveyed 1,000 women who had recently had a baby and found that half had a mental health or emotional problem postnatally or during pregnancy. Of these, nearly half hadn’t had their problem identified by a health professional and hadn’t received any help or treatment. Many of these new mothers said they were too embarrassed or afraid of judgement to seek help.

The document can be downloaded here

Additional link: RCGP press release

Digital educational programme on nurses’ knowledge, confidence and attitudes in providing care for children and young people who have self-harmed

Manning, J.C. (2017) BMJ Open. 7:e014750.

organic-1280538_960_720.jpg

Objectives: (1) To determine the impact of a digital educational intervention on the knowledge, attitudes, confidence and behavioural intention of registered children’s nurses working with children and young people (CYP) admitted with self-harm.

(2) To explore the perceived impact, suitability and usefulness of the intervention.

Intervention: A digital educational intervention that had been co-produced with CYP service users, registered children’s nurses and academics.

Conclusions: The effect of the intervention is promising and demonstrates the potential it has in improving registered children’s nurse’s knowledge, confidence and attitudes. However, further testing is required to confirm this.

Read the full article here

Mindfulness-Based Interventions During Pregnancy

Dhillon, A. et al. Mindfulness | Published online 17 April 2017

yoga-1883321_960_720

This systematic review aims to assess the effect of mindfulness-based interventions carried out during pregnancy exploring mindfulness and mental health outcomes.

Pooled results of the non-RCTs reporting anxiety, depression and perceived stress showed a significant benefit for the mindfulness group. Mindfulness as an outcome was assessed in four RCTs for which the pooled results show a significant difference in favour of the mindfulness intervention when compared to a control group. The pooled results of the four non-RCTs also indicate a significant difference following mindfulness intervention.

Results suggest that mindfulness-based interventions can be beneficial for outcomes such as anxiety, depression, perceived stress and levels of mindfulness during the perinatal period. Further research would be useful to explore if such benefits are sustained during the post-natal period.

Read the article here

World Health Day 2017 – Depression

This year’s World Health Day (7 April 2017) focuses on the World Health Organisation’s one-year global campaign on depression.

depression

Image source: http://www.who.int

Depression is the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide. According to the latest estimates from WHO, more than 300 million people are now living with depression, an increase of more than 18% between 2005 and 2015. Lack of support for people with mental disorders, coupled with a fear of stigma, prevent many from accessing the treatment they need to live healthy, productive lives.

Despite being very common, depression is still under-recognized and undertreated and there is a need to open up dialogue and tackle the stigma associated with it.  The campaign provides information regarding the consequences and management of depression, and how to provide support to people living with depression. Resources include videos, handouts and posters.

Read more at World Health Organisation

Additional links:

Youths’ Perceptions of Health Care Provider Roles in Addressing Bullying

Vessey, J.A. et al. Journal of Pediatric Health Care | Published online: 4 March 2017

head-826319_960_720

Introduction: Youth bullying is a critical public health problem, with those exposed to bullying at risk for development of serious sequelae lasting into adulthood. The purpose of this study was to explore youths’ perceptions regarding the role that advanced practice nurses and physicians play in addressing bullying.

Discussion: Youths recognized a narrow role for health care providers in addressing bullying, characterizing bullying as a school- or-community-related issue rather than one influencing health.

Read the full abstract here

Insufficient evidence to support depression prevention programmes

Cristea, I. The Mental Elf Blog. Published online: 21 February 2017

depression-1347544_960_720.jpg

Research on prevention differentiates between universal interventions, which are implemented for a designated population regardless of the risk (e.g., all school-age children) and targeted interventions, which are aimed at a population at high risk for a disorder. Recent large trials in adults covered on the Mental Elf showed prevention of depression is particularly effective when it is targeted.

In a recent Cochrane systematic review, Hetrick and colleagues examined whether three evidence-based psychological interventions (cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy (IPT) and ‘third wave’ CBT) are effective in preventing the onset of depressive disorder in children and adolescents.

Read the full overview here

Read the original research article here

What can be done to tackle the youth mental health treatment gap?

Too few children and young people are getting the care they need. A new commission at Birmingham university aims to address the problem | The Guardian

snail-1447233_960_720.jpg

By 2020 one in three teenagers will have access to cancer treatment in England. Think about that: only one in three. There would be an outcry. It would be scandalous, horrifying, unacceptable.

It is not true, however. Unless you delete the word “cancer” and insert “mental health”, and then it is.

In medical terms, there is a treatment gap. The number of children and young people living with a diagnosable mental illness far exceeds the number who get any help. One in 10 children suffer a diagnosable mental illness, yet just one in four of them receive treatment. By 2020 the gap may close, a little, if plans in NHS England’s Five Year Forward View for Mental Health are realised, but only a little.

Read the full news story here