Preventing tooth decay in children under five

This professional resource from Public Health England outlines how health professionals, councils and partners can help prevent tooth decay in children under 5 as part of ensuring every child has the best start in life.

The guidance covers the following areas:

  • Scale of the problem
  • Risk factors for tooth decay
  • How to prevent tooth decay
  • Effective interventions for improving dental health
Preventing decay

Image Source: http://www.gov.uk

Protection of Nurses Working with Children and Young People

This guidance aims to raise awareness among nurses and their managers of the complex issues surrounding safeguarding in the context of relationships between nurses and children and young people.

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Image source: http://www.rcn.org.uk

In the publication, the Royal College of Nursing  include the age range of 0-18 (up to 25 years in line SEND reforms) in this definition and also advocate the need for special consideration in view of children and young people who may have a disability, or other need that affects their mental capacity to make decisions. This guidance concentrates on allegations of abuse made against staff such as smacking a child and inappropriate physical contact.

Click here to view this guidance.

Guidelines aim to help identify and treat stroke in children

New guidelines on recognising and managing stroke in children have been launched by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the Stroke Association to help prevent the potential damage that can occur if symptoms go unrecognised.

Every year around 400 children in the UK have a stroke, and many are left with severe physical and mental impairments.

The guidelines say that most children experiencing a stroke will have similar symptoms to adults—specifically, weakness of the face and on one side of the body and difficulty with speech. Less commonly, childhood strokes may present with seizures or fits affecting one part of the body or, rarely, a new onset sudden severe headache, the guidelines say, adding that many children will have non-specific signs of illness, such as a decrease in consciousness level or vomiting.

The guidelines also highlight a lack of evidence in terms of treating childhood stroke. In a foreword to the guidelines Tony Rudd, professor of stroke medicine at King’s College, London and national clinical director for stroke at NHS England, says that the first edition of the guideline was published 12 years ago and that one of its main findings was the lack of research into stroke in childhood.

Full document: Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, Stroke Association. Stroke in childhood: clinical guideline for diagnosis, management and rehabilitation. May 2017.

 

Cerebral palsy in under 25s: assessment and management

NICE guideline [NG62] | Published date: January 2017

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Image source: NICE

This guideline covers diagnosing, assessing and managing cerebral palsy in children and young people from birth up to their 25th birthday. It aims to make sure they get the care and treatment they need for the developmental and clinical comorbidities associated with cerebral palsy, so that they can be as active and independent as possible.

This guideline includes recommendations on:

Read the full guidelines here

Postpartum Haemorrhage, Prevention and Management (Green-top Guideline No. 52)

This guideline provides information about the prevention and management of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). This is the second edition of this guideline, which was published in 2009 under the same title | RCOG

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Image source: RCOP

PPH is the most common form of major obstetric haemorrhage. The traditional definition of primary PPH is the loss of 500 ml or more of blood from the genital tract within 24 hours of the birth of a baby. PPH can be minor (500–1000 ml) or major (more than 1000 ml). Major could be divided to moderate (1000–2000 ml) or severe (more than 2000 ml). The recommendations in this guideline apply to women experiencing primary PPH of 500 ml or more.

Read the full guidelines here

Monochorionic twin pregnancy management

This is the second edition of this guideline, previously published under the same title in December 2008.

The Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecologists has updated its guideline Monochorionic Twin Pregnancy, Management Green-top Guideline No. 51.

The purpose of this guideline is to describe and, if possible, quantify the problems associated with monochorionic placentation and to identify the best evidence to guide clinical care, including routine fetal surveillance and treatment of complications at secondary and tertiary levels.

Additional links: RCOG press release  |  Royal College of Midwives