Azithromycin Prophylaxis for Cesarean Delivery

Rothaus, C. The New England Journal of Medicine. Published online: September 29th 2016

Cesarean delivery is the most common major surgical procedure and is associated with a rate of surgical-site infection (including endometritis and wound infection) that is 5 to 10 times the rate for vaginal delivery. Tita et al. assessed whether the addition of azithromycin to standard antibiotic prophylaxis before skin incision would reduce the incidence of infection after cesarean section among women who were undergoing nonelective cesarean delivery during labor or after membrane rupture. In this new Original Article involving women who received standard antibiotic prophylaxis for nonelective cesarean section, the risk of infection after surgery was lower with the addition of azithromycin than with placebo.

Clinical Pearl

• How does pregnancy-associated infection rank as a cause of maternal death in the United States?

Globally, pregnancy-associated infection is a major cause of maternal death and is the fourth most common cause in the United States.

Clinical Pearl

• How often do postoperative infections occur after nonelective cesarean delivery?

Despite routine use of antibiotic prophylaxis (commonly, a cephalosporin given before skin incision), infection after cesarean section remains an important concern, particularly among women who undergo nonelective procedures (i.e., unscheduled cesarean section during labor, after membrane rupture, or for maternal or fetal emergencies). As many as 60 to 70% of all cesarean deliveries are nonelective; postoperative infections occur in up to 12% of women undergoing nonelective cesarean delivery with standard preincision prophylaxis.#

Read the full Now@NEJM Blog post here

Read the original research article here

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