Rising cases of scarlet fever

Public Health England has published an update on rising scarlet fever cases across England.

There have been 1319 new cases between 21 to 27 March, the highest weekly total recorded in recent decades. A total of 10,570 cases of scarlet fever have now been reported since the season began in September 2015.

PHE scarlet fever

Image source: www.gov.uk/

Scarlet fever is a seasonal illness which should be treated with antibiotics and cases of the illness usually peak at this time of year.

An increase in invasive disease caused by the same bacterium group A streptococcus (GAS) which causes scarlet fever has also been seen in England. A total of 593 cases of invasive GAS infection, such and bloodstream infection or pneumonia, have been notified so far for 2016 compared to 440 cases for the same period last year (January to March).

Whilst the elderly remain most at risk of invasive GAS infection, increased levels of disease compared to last year have been seen in young adults and children less than 5 years old, the age groups most affected by influenza in recent weeks. There’s no suggestion of an increase in invasive GAS infection in patients diagnosed with scarlet fever.

This is the third season in a row in which elevated scarlet fever activity has been noted. A total of 15,637 notifications were made in England and Wales in 2014, rising to 17,590 in 2015. Weekly activity so far this season has been similar or slightly above for that last year.

Scarlet fever is mainly a childhood disease and is most common between the ages of 2 and 8 years. It was once a very dangerous infection, but has now become much less serious, thanks to the use of antibiotics. There is currently no vaccine for scarlet fever.

Read more here

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